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Posted by Mark Consolmagno Michelle Curran Team on 12/6/2017

If you recently moved to a new town or city, you might be feeling a little lost when it comes to finding your place in the community. In a time when many of us gather digitally rather than in-person, it can be particularly difficult to find ways to get to know your neighbors and become involved in local affairs.

In this article, we’ll talk about some ways you can discover and engage yourself in your local community.

Start online

Even if you’re interested in meeting your townsfolk in person, the internet is still a good place to start. You can use Facebook and MeetUp to find local groups and events. Trying looking up groups for things you’re interested in, such as a hiking or cycling meetup, a book club, or knitting group.

While you’re online, see if you can find your town’s website, including sites for the local library, museums, or historical societies. All of these sites probably have mailing lists or notification systems you can join to receive alerts for upcoming events and activities.

If you’d rather spontaneously meet some people in your area, check out some of the popular bars, cafes, and restaurants on Yelp to see where people like to hang out.

Get a library card

Public libraries are an amazing service that is offered free-of-charge. Where else can you go to get free books, movies, music, and games?

On top of that, libraries also tend to offer passes to local museums, another great way to meet people and learn about the area you moved to. Be sure to stay in the loop with upcoming events at the library, as they often play host to interesting presentations, classes, and meetings.

Classes offered through your local library are often free or highly affordable alternatives to those you might take at a private school or local college. Man libraries now even host yoga classes and “paint nights” so expect to find a lot more than books and readings on their calendar of events.

Start something new

If your town doesn’t have something that you’re interested in, why not start it yourself? One rising service in urban and suburban communities across the country is the community garden.

Community gardens are owned and operated by members of the community. You can rent a space in the garden or join up with others and share space.

A community garden is a great way to get outside, enjoy fresh produce, save money at the grocery store, and meet your neighbors at the same time.

A good way to bring up ideas like this is to attend your town meetings. You don’t want to seem too overbearing or industrious, so try to just sit-in on a meeting or two before bringing up any new ideas.

Say “hello” to the neighbors

One of the oldest and easiest ways to learn about your new neighborhood is to simply stop and talk with the people in your neighborhood. Aside from making friends, getting to know your neighbors can be beneficial. Neighbors watch out for each other’s houses when someone is away, and look out for each other’s well-being. It’s good to have a kind neighbor on your side.






Posted by Mark Consolmagno Michelle Curran Team on 10/25/2017

It’s easy to feel alienated when you move to a new city or town in today’s world. Traditionally, being friendly with neighbors was much more valued in decades past than it is now. And, with the help of things like Facebook and Skype, it’s easier to stay in touch with your old friends from your previous town than it is to make new ones in your new town. 

There is, however, much to be said about becoming involved in your local community. You’ll meet new people, discover new places to explore, and can make new friends in the process.

So, how can you go about involving yourself in your new town? Read on for our advice.

Say “hi” to the neighbors

Meeting the neighbors can be beneficial in a number of ways. They’ll be able to give you the lowdown on your neighborhood, including any issues you might want to be made aware of.

They’ll also be able to tell you if they notice anything strange or concerning around your house when you’re at work. And, if you go away on vacation, a good neighbor might volunteer to take in your mail for you or water your plants.

Find local events

There are a number of ways to find out what’s happening in your new town and get involved with them. Some places we recommend that you check frequently are:

  • Local newspapers and magazines

  • Library and town hall bulletin boards

  • Facebook groups for your town

  • Craigslist community boards

  • Meetup.com groups

You could also check out some local businesses, including cafes and restaurants, to introduce yourself to some of the people who likely live and work in your town.

Learn a new skill

One of the best ways to become involved in your new community is to find out what classes are offered nearby and to join one that you’re interested in. If fitness and wellness are one of your priorities you could consider joining a yoga or fitness class.

If you’re more into crafting, see what classes are available at the local library. And, while you’re there, ask the librarians for recommendations for local places to visit, whether it be museums or specialty stores.

Volunteer your time or skills

If you’d like to give back to your community a great way to do so is to volunteer for a local cause. Many cities and towns have neighborhood or park cleanups. Others have food pantries and assistance for the elderly.

If you have a skill that you think could be useful, such as carpentry or graphic design, find out if any local groups could use your skill.

Go to town meetings

If you want to quickly learn some of the ongoing issues and conversations in your town the weekly or monthly town meetings are a great way to familiarize yourself. Most towns and cities post their meeting schedule online and even offer recordings of past meetings if you want to get a feel for what the meetings are like before attending.

Other places that meetings are held that could be of interest are the local library, churches or spiritual centers, and parks or the town common.




Tags: community   moving   involved  
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Posted by Mark Consolmagno Michelle Curran Team on 6/29/2016

Visit the local library and ask what you receive with a library membership. You will be quite surprised at what the library has to offer. Museum passes are available for reserve. Generally these passes allow up to four people to enter the venue for a discounted price, if not free. Not to mention what a fun day trip to a place you may never have thought to visit. Some libraries reciprocate too, giving you double or triple the access to passes, books, and items of interest. If you are looking to take a class, many local clubs meet at the library. Knitting classes, babysitting classes, scouts or children’s groups are most likely on the librarian’s schedule. If you are looking to take a boating safety class, don’t be surprised if the meeting is being held at the library once a week for a month. How convenient. All of the library offerings are one way to get to know your community and the people in your community. The offerings are fantastic and endless. And enjoyable for the whole family.







Mark Consolmagno Michelle Curran Team
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